With The Right Strategy, Social Media WILL Increase Your Patient Volume

June 11, 2010

Over the last five years, the way people communicate has dramatically changed. More than ever you have powerful social media tools of influence, if used correctly, you will generate traffic which you can convert into  increased patient volume in specific areas.

Don’t know where to start…Start with defining your focus and strategy. This will ensure you stay focused on driving the right patient with the right payer to the right service line.

Forrester Research created an acronym to help keep you on track. P.O.S.T.

  • People: Your target audience
  • Objective: What you want to accomplish
  • Strategy: Plan how your relationship with customers will change
  • Technology: Decide what social media technologies to use

This sounds simple, but it is the key to a successful social media strategy. Today’s world is full of bright shiny objects. Your strategy will keep you on course and give you the opportunity to take advantage of new technologies while driving patient volume.

One thing is true, the way we communicate is going to continue to evolve, but it is never going back to the way it was before. Now is the time for you to engage and influence your target audience through social media.

Finance will thank you.

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Will a Voice of the Customer (VoC) Program Increase Patient Volume??

June 7, 2010

A survey by Forrester Research says over 60% of large North American companies now have a voice of the customer (VoC) program. This can also work for hospitals… as long as the information is used to really relate to the patient and we are willing to actually change the way we do business.

A wise businessperson once told me that if your patient believes that you profoundly understand them you will never hurt for patients or referring physicians. That is the type of place everyone wants to take their business.

Voice of the customer (VoC) is a term used to describe the in-depth process of capturing a customer’s expectations, preferences and aversions.

Much has been written about this process, a lot of it is corporate-speak and not particularly helpful, but it starts with the many possible ways to gather the qualitative information –  traditional research techniques like focus groups, or individual interviews, psychographic studies, plain old customer surveys or whatever, etc. You focus on the customers’ experiences with you or competitive alternatives. Insights, not data, are gathered.

Forrester Research says here that there are six critical pieces of this process

  1. listening
  2. interpreting
  3. reacting
  4. monitoring
  5. culture and alignments
  6. governance and organization

These last two are where you really make organization changes.

In hospitals,  your “Would Recommend” score on the CMS data (Center for Medicare & Medicaid Service) tells the story of whether your clinical volumes will increase – no matter how much money you spend on branding or marketing. Read more about managing patient experience.

As a hospital marketer one of the most important things you should be managing is the patient experience.

Maybe your marketing team taking the leadership to actually start a formal VoC program is a way to get your whole organization on board with critical patient experience changes.


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